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I'm an arts journalist & PR consultant living and working in Scotland. I've been a journalist for more than 25 years. I write a regular column for Scottish quality newspaper, The Herald. I deliver a PR service with an arty bent and work on a consultancy basis with arts organisations, including Scotland's leading creative industries festival, XpoNorth & broadcast support body, ScreenHI. I am currently co-writing a book about the celebrated Scots artist, George Wyllie, with his daughter Louise. Instrumental in making a celebration of his life's work happen in 2012. For more information, see www.georgewyllie.com When I'm not being a mum/working, I talk to my dog. He laps it up. Contact me on janpatience@me.com (All work © Jan Patience)

Tuesday, 16 February 2010

Gallery Round-Up - Herald Arts section, 13/02/10






Clockwise, from left, 'Conversations' etching and drypoint by Kate Downie, Red Venus 3 by Elspeth Lamb
and Light Blue Venus, also by Elspeth Lamb







GALLERY ROUND-UP

Dürer and Italy
Hunterian Art Gallery
82 Hillhead Street, Glasgow
0141 330 4221
www.hunterian.gla.ac.uk/durer/
Mon-Sat, 9.30am-5pm
Until March 22

Widely regarded as the greatest artist of the Northern Renaissance, Albrecht Dürer (1471 -1528) was a printmaker, painter and mathematician from Nuremberg, who established his reputation - primarily as a printmaker - while still in his twenties.
One of the first great artist to achieve fame through his prints, this exhibition at The Hunterian showcases a series of engraved masterpieces by Dürer alongside contemporary Italian works and illustrates the cross-cultural exchange of ideas which took place in the first three decades of the sixteenth century.
Dürer’s fascination with Italy began early. His godfather, the Nuremberg publisher Anton Koberger, traded books and prints with Venice, contributing to the young Dürer’s enthusiasm. He made two journeys to Italy in 1494 and 1505-7, during which he promoted himself as an artist, studied art, and met engravers and exponents of the art of perspective, still an unknown in Germany at that time.
Dürer’s woodcuts, which were cheap and often sold as bound sets, were bestsellers, with the most popular being two series of the Passion of Christ and another of the Life of the Virgin. His astonishingly detailed engravings of landscapes and figures were more expensive and became popular with artists and collectors, particularly in Italy. The painter Raphael, based in Rome, was heavily influenced by the work of Dürer. Raphael did not make prints himself, but as he wished to publish his imagery, he provided sketches to be engraved by artists such as Marcantonio Raimondi.
Two of Marcantonio’s best known works, Judgement of Paris and Massacre of the Innocents are on display in this exhibition and provide a beautiful if classical counterpoint to Dürer's visionary work, which is heavily tinged by his roots in Gothic illustration.

ELSPETH LAMB
Harbour Arts Centre
114–116 Harbour Street, Irvine
01294 274059
www.north-ayrshire.gov.uk
Monday-Saturday, 10am-5pm (4pm on Friday), Sunday, 11am-5pm
Until March 7

Scotland has its own share of master printmakers, who labour intensively over their work with skill and passion in equal measure.
Glasgow-based Elspeth Lamb’s work presents a virtuoso mix of technical brilliance and delicate, life-affirming beauty and this exhibition in Irvine’s Harbour Arts Centre is a superb opportunity to view the work of one of the finest stone lithographers around.
This show has arrived at Irvine via a circuitous route. Prior to becoming a full-time artist in 1999, Lamb was a lecturer in printmaking at Edinburgh College of Art and the college had a summer school association with the Miro Foundation at Cala Major in Mallorca. During the 1990s, Lamb ran several workshops for Spanish artists in different print techniques and maintained contact with the printmakers in the workshop there.
A couple of years ago, she was asked to take a organise and host a trip to the Foundation for a group of young people from North Aryshire as the council already had an tie-in with a language school in Mallorca and were keen build cultural links on the island.
Lamb travelled to Mallorca with a group of young people and spent an intensive three days printing in the workshop, with the result being a calendar of the young artists’ collagraphs and linocuts.
Last April, she returned to make a couple of print editions at the workshops as part of a residency set up by North Ayrshire and the result is this exhibition in Irvine. During the course of the exhibition, as part of her residency remit, Lamb will give artist talks to local school children.

KATE DOWNIE: PRINTWORKS
The Watermill Gallery, Mill Street, Aberfeldy
01887 822 896
www.aberfeldywatermill.com
Open seven days a week, 10am-5pm (11am Sunday)
Until March 15

Kate Downie’s outstanding Coast Road Diaries exhibition, in which she pays homage to a selection of Scotland’s finest artists from the modern age, is currently energising all who view it at Gracefield Arts Centre in Dumfries, before heading up to Duff House in Banff in May.
Downie draws like a dream and her skill as a painter and printmaker is writ large in the Diaries. She is also no mean wordsmith, as the text of the catalogue reveals.
In this, her third exhibition at the Watermill in Aberfeldy (a destination gallery if ever there was one), she features 21 years worth of printmaking and other works on paper from 1988 to 2009.
This is a superb opportunity to see the breadth of print exploration in Kate Downie’s work and features 17 works in a variety of techniques - monotypes, screenprints, etchings, lithography and collagraphs.
The subject range is broad, from an early morning mystery dog caught sniffing a lamppost in Leith, to a smouldering industrial landscape. The scope of this exhibition may wide, but it is held together by the artist’s instinctive skill for capturing light and atmosphere.
Through bold use of colour and form and an unerring eye, Downie’s prints present an heightened vision of her surroundings. It is almost as though, as viewers, we are seeing through the eyes of someone in a particularly raw state, exposed to the world for the first time.

ends

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